June 5, 2013

Shrimpy

Richard Avedon and Peter Lindbergh

Richard Avedon, who would revolutionize fashion photography through his dynamic, active images, often incorporated elements of dance and theatrics into his photographs. In 1970, Avedon photographed model Jean Shrimpton in an evening dress by Pierre Cardin that billowed with her swift movements.  In the April 2009 issue ...

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June 3, 2013

Blow by Blow

Isabella Blow and Lady Gaga

Credited with discovering and nurturing the careers of Alexander McQueen, Philip Treacy, Stella Tennant and Sophie Dahl, Isabella Blow’s influence on fashion is still felt today. Outlandish and often times borderline-garish, Isabella Blow was a true fashion eccentric known for her whimsical hats and surreal ...

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May 31, 2013

Drown Your Sorrows

John Everett Millais and Jean-Charles De Castelbajac

As one of the three founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, John Everett Millais, would create some of the most well-known imagery of the Pre-Raphaelite movement which looked to Quattrocento or 15th-century Italian art. Shakespeare often served as inspiration to the Pre-Raphaelites, famously depicted in ...

Art | Costume   ::   0 Comment
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May 29, 2013

Reach for the Sky

Camilla Akrans

Born Arthur Kanofsky, Art Kane was an Art Director-turned photographer in the second half of the 20th century. A protégé of famed Art Director Alexey Brodovitch, Kane would make the transition in 1958 after gaining recognition for a jazz-themed editorial he photographed for Esquire magazine. Kane would come to be ...

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May 28, 2013

Two-Faced

Erwin Blumenfeld and Camilla Åkrans

German photographer Erwin Blumenfeld’s Dada background is evident in his collage-like images and photographic manipulations. For the cover of Vogue’s November 1, 1944 issue, Blumenfeld aimed to represent the void in the 1940s woman’s life, created by her husband off at war. The photographer placed a ...

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