50 Shades of Glasses

Bob Gruen and Alexei HayThe album art of John Lennon’s 1974 record “Walls and Bridges” featured an image of the artist’s multi-bespectacled face, photographed by Bob Gruen. The over-accessorized pic riffed on Lennon’s ever-present round specs. For Elle Italia‘s April 2011 issue, photographer Alexei Hay showcased the season’s offerings of glasses, layering shade upon shade onto model Hana Soukupova for an editorial titled “Eye on You.”

 

John Lennon by Bob Gruen, 1974

John Lennon by Bob Gruen, 1974

 

 

Hana Soukupova by Alexei Hay for Elle Italy April, 2011

Hana Soukupova by Alexei Hay for Elle Italy April, 2011

 

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Ride A Wave

Martin Munkacsi and Gianpaolo BarbieriWith a background in reportage and sports photography, Hungarian photographer Martin Munkacsi became a pioneer in active, candid-style fashion photography.  Ca. 1929, Munkacsi captured a motorcyclist in Budapest splashing his way through a puddle; the image typified the photographer’s dynamic images so full of life. Years later, it would appear Gianpaolo Barbieri would look to Munkacsi when photographing model Christiana Steidten atop a Guzzi motorcycle for Vogue Italia, 1974.

 

Comparison Courtesy of: Juan Andrés Puertas

Martin Munkacsi Motorcyclist, Budapest, ca. 1929

Martin Munkacsi Motorcyclist, Budapest, ca. 1929

Christiana Steidten by Gian Paolo Barbieri for Vogue Italia, 1974

Christiana Steidten by Gian Paolo Barbieri for Vogue Italia, 1974

 

 

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Extra Extra

ET and Sebastian FaenaIt would seem the cultural impact of Steven Spielberg’s 1982 film ET knows no bounds, apparent even in the realm of fashion. For the fourth issue of Carine Roitfeld’s fledgling magazine CR Fashion Book, the 80s flick directly inspired the editorial “E.T. A Tale of Friendship and Loss,” photographed by Sebastian Faena. In the story, the cherub-faced Lindsey Wixson plays then seven-year-old Drew Barrymore, showcasing the naive fashions of the spring 2014 collections.

 

ET, 1982

ET, 1982

 

 

Lindsey Wixson by Sebastian Faena for CR Fashion Book #4

Lindsey Wixson by Sebastian Faena for CR Fashion Book #4

 

 

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Make a Splash

? and Mert and MarcusJean Paul Gaultier’s 2009 SS campaign featured a denim-clad couple soaking in a bathtub. For Love Magazine’s SS 2013 issue, photographer duo Mert and Marcus also took to the tub when photographing Cara Delevingne, Kate Moss and Chloe Moretz.

 

Jean Paul- Gaultier Jeans SS 2009 Ad

Jean Paul- Gaultier Jeans SS 2009 Ad

 

 

Cara Delevingne by Mert and Marcus for Love #9 SS 2013

Cara Delevingne by Mert and Marcus for Love #9 SS 2013

 

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Wing It

Cecil Beaton and Ulyana Sergeenko

In 1956, Cecil Beaton costumed the debut broadway production of My Fair Lady, which would earn the prolific photographer and costumer designer a Tony for Best Costume Design. Two years later, Beaton would design the costumes for another — this time on-screen — musical, Gigi. Both musicals were rag-to-riches tales inspired by Pygmalion that ended with splendid Beaton gowns. In the film, Gigi’s transformation is materialized as she appears in a white satin winged gown for dinner in fin-desiècle Paris. If visual evidence is anything to go by, Beaton’s off-the-shoulder gown appears to have inspired a black satin dress that appeared in the Spring/Summer 2014 collection of Ulyana Sergeenko, the Russian couture patron cum couture designer.

 

Comparison Courtesy of: Juan Andrés Puertas

Leslie Caron in Cecil Beaton for Gigi, 1958

Leslie Caron in Cecil Beaton for Gigi, 1958

 

Ulyana Sergeenko SS 2014

Ulyana Sergeenko SS 2014

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Smoke and Mirrors

Erwin Blumenfeld and Mert and MarcusGerman photographer Erwin Blumenfeld’s Dada background is evident in his collage-like images and photographic manipulations. In 1943, Blumenfeld would place model Lisette behind a full-length panel of fluted glass, photographing her rippled, fragmented silhouette. In 2012, photographer duo Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott would employ a similar tactic in photographing Madonna’s MDMA Album cover.

Lisette Behind Fluted Glass by Erwin Blumenfeld, 1943

Lisette Behind Fluted Glass by Erwin Blumenfeld, 1943

 

Madonna by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, 2012

Madonna by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, 2012

 

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An Arm and A Leg

YSL and Jean Charles de CastelbajacA year after Yves Saint Laurent debuted his Mondrian-inspired shift dresses, the designer continued his appropriation of art into fashion with his Fall/Winter 1966-67 “Pop Art” dresses. This crop of dresses featured fragmented silhouettes of the female figure printed atop columnar shaped gowns, perhaps suggesting the nude body beneath the cloth. For Jean Charles de Castelbajac’s SS 2014 show, the designer would feature a dress with an uncanny resemblance to YSL’s 1966 version.

 

Pop Art Dress by Yves Saint Laurent, Fall Winter 1966-67

Pop Art Dress by Yves Saint Laurent, Fall Winter 1966-67

 

Jean Charles de Castelbajac, SS 2014

Jean Charles de Castelbajac, SS 2014

 

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Lady Godiva

John Collier and Walter ChinSociety takes peculiar measures when burdened with high taxes: Some throw tea into the harbor while others take to touring the town on horseback in the nude. The latter, of course, being the method employed by Lady Godiva, the 11th-century noblewomen whose husband would only relinquish the oppressive taxes he imposed on his people if his wife bared all on bareback. While the legitimacy of this fable has been questioned, it has nonetheless become the subject of countless paintings and sculptures, most notably, John Collier’s 19th-century rendition, ca. 1897. In Collier’s Pre-Raphaelite painting, a modest Lady Godiva sits atop a white horse, her brilliant red hair her only shield against possible voyeurs or a Peeping Tom — the town tailer who, as legend has it, took a peek at the clothes-less Lady Godiva.

In 2000, a fresh-faced Gisele Bündchen was photographed by Walter Chin for Vanity Fair’s January spotlight on the young model. Undoubtedly inspired by the legendary tale, Chin photographed Gisele nude and perched on a white horse for the story, “Unbridled Beauty.”

 

 

Lady Godiva by John Collier, ca. 1897. Housed at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum

Lady Godiva by John Collier, ca. 1897. Housed at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum

 

Gisele Bündchen by Walter Chin for Vanity Fair January, 2000.

Gisele Bündchen by Walter Chin for Vanity Fair January, 2000.

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Showers and Flowers

Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello and Camilla Akrans

For Numero’s June/July edition, photography duo Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello would dip model Coco Rocha into a bathtub, brightly colored flowers swirling around her, afloat in the bath water.  Appearing ethereal and weightless, Rocha resembles a Gustav Klimt mermaid. Nearly a year later, photographer Camilla Åkrans shot Mariacarla Boscono in a flower-filled tub, however, in this version, the tub is empty save for the exotic blooms.

Coco Rocha by Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello for Numero June/July, 2008

Coco Rocha by Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello for Numero June/July, 2008

Mariacarla Boscono by Camilla Akrans for Vogue Nippon March, 2009

Mariacarla Boscono by Camilla Akrans for Vogue Nippon March, 2009

 

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With Open Arms

Nixon and Karl LagerfeldShowcasing the president’s popularity in the entertainment world, Esquire magazine’s June 1969 cover featured the newly elected President Nixon along with his celebrity backers including Art Linkletter, Billy Graham, Rudy Vallee & Lawrence Welk. The men pictured stand with welcoming arms, wide open with optimism as they praise their new leader. To celebrate the magazine’s 75th Anniversary, in 2008 British Esquire looked back to their celebrated Art Director George Lois and recreated several of his 60s covers. Contemporary fashion designers played along in the restaged images, with Karl Lagerfeld chosen to recreate the 1969 Nixon cover. In this version, the celebrity supporters were replaced with multiple images of Karl Lagerfeld himself–perhaps to say he may be his own biggest fan.

 

Esquire Magazine, June 1969

Esquire Magazine, June 1969

 

Karl Lagerfeld by Karl Lagerfeld for Esquire UK June, 2008

Karl Lagerfeld by Karl Lagerfeld for Esquire UK June, 2008

 

 

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