Hats Off

Cristobal Balenciaga and Nicolas GhesquiereA year before the designer’s final collection, Cristóbal Balenciaga introduced his single-seam wedding dress in 1967. Balenciaga would take cues from the period’s affinity for futuristic cuts and tech fabrics, and in this case, reappropriated them into the unlikeliest of places, the traditional white wedding dress. With just one seam, the dress suggests it was born, rather than made, void of any elements that reveal the adroit human hands responsible for its existence. A similarly smooth monastic-like hood replaced the obvious white lace veil, making for a complete space age bride. In 2008, then-Balenciaga designer Nicolas Ghesquière looked to the house’s archives and reintroduced the mod headpiece for the brand’s SS 2008 collection. Four years later, the habit-like hat was once again brought back to life by Ghesquière for Balenciaga’s SS 2012 show, this time, however, the hood was offered up as a visor and was immediately stopped atop the heads of several daring fashion week fixtures.

 

Single-seam Wedding Gown by Cristóbal Balenciaga, 1967

Single-seam Wedding Gown by Cristóbal Balenciaga, 1967

 

Jennifer Connolly for Balenciaga, SS 2008

Jennifer Connolly for Balenciaga, SS 2008

 

 

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Mousing Around

Herb Ritts and Thomas WhitesideIn 1987, Herb Ritts photographed Madonna in bed and undressed, save for the pair of minnie mouse ears affixed atop her head. Amused, she directs her gaze upwards, focusing further attention on the seemingly out-of-place Disney memorabilia.  For Elle Magazine’s May 2013 issue, Rita Ora covers the ”Women in Music Issue” issue, similarly topped with a pair of mouse ears, however, Ora’s Philip Treacy headpiece is more Deadmau5 than Minnie Mouse.

 

Madonna, Tokyo by Herb Ritts, 1987

Madonna, Tokyo by Herb Ritts, 1987

 

 

Rita Ora in Philip Treacy by Thomas Whiteside for Elle May, 2013

Rita Ora in Philip Treacy by Thomas Whiteside for Elle May, 2013

 

 

 

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Face to Face

12.31 Elsa Schiaparelli and Miu Miu

A contemporary of Salvador Dalí and Jean Cocteau, Elsa Schiaparelli’s transgressive designs were often inspired by the surrealists.  A violet, satin evening coat was the result of Schiaparelli’s collaboration with Jean Cocteau in 1937 and was almost certainly the inspiration for a jacket seen on Miu Miu’s SS 2014 runways–almost a year after the Costume Institute’s exhibition, Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations.

Elsa Schiaparelli Evening Coat, 1937

Elsa Schiaparelli Evening Coat, 1937

Miu Miu SS 2014

Miu Miu SS 2014

 

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Bend Over Backwards

Helmut Newton and Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh MatadinA year after photographing YSL’s Le Smoking Jacket on a damp Paris street, Helmut Newton would photograph a beachfront Charlotte Rampling topsy turvey in a black one piece.  For the June/July 2012 issue of Vogue Paris, Dutch photographer duo Inez & Vinoodh photographed Gisele Bündchen similarly upside down in a yoga-like pose on the beach.

 

Charlotte Rampling by Helmut Newton, 1976

Charlotte Rampling by Helmut Newton for Vogue Paris, 1976

 

 

Gisele Bündchen by Inez & Vinoodh for <i>Vogue Paris</i> July/June, 2013

Gisele Bündchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris July/June, 2012

 

 

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A Cut Above

Richard Avedon and Patrick DemarchelierVogue’s 1966 editorial, “The Girl in the Fabulous Furs” featured 26 pages of Veruschka swathed in exotic furs, traversing about Japan on the Bullet Train, (then, the world’s fastest train) along with her stay in a traditional Japanese inn where an additional room was required to house the abundant furs brought along the journey. In the editorial,  the symbolic act of cutting hair was lightly restaged with a topless Veruschka seated and ready to be rid of her long hair. Further emphasizing the impact of a model’s change of appearance, Patrick Demarchelier documented Karlie Kloss’s transition from a long haired ingénue to a sophisticated gamine, which swiftly prompted several models and subsequently countless fashion conscious individuals to chop off several inches of their own hair.

 

Veruschka by Richard Avedon for <i>Vogue</i> October 15, 1966.

Veruschka by Richard Avedon for Vogue October 15, 1966.

 

Karlie Kloss by Patrick Demarchelier for <i>Vogue</i> January 2013.

Karlie Kloss by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue January 2013.

 

 

 

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Penn it In

Irving Penn and Mario Testino

With the return of the midi skirt, along with Raf Simons citing the Dior archives as the predominant inspiration behind his latest collection for the house, it seems a sense of mid-century glamour is having a moment. As Vogue’s leading photographer, Irving Penn’s sharp postwar imagery pierced the pages of the magazine in his signature high-contrast, black and white imagery. Penn’s unforgettable cover for the magazine’s April 1, 1950 issue features an immaculate Jean Patchett, enveloped in net and wrapped in a scarf, much like a life-sized New Look Barbie. For Vogue China’s December 2013 issue, Mario Testino would look back to Penn’s oeuvre with an editorial reminiscent of Penn’s early work at Vogue. Model Shu Qi plays the role of Jean Patchett, restaging some of Penn’s most well-known imagery.

Jean Patchett by Irving Penn for Vogue April 1 1950.

Jean Patchett by Irving Penn for Vogue April 1 1950.

 

Shu Qi by Mario Testino for Vogue China December, 2013.

Shu Qi by Mario Testino for Vogue China December, 2013.

 

 

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McQueen Antoinette

Alexander McQueen and Victoria's SecretTo fête the release the Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette in 2006, Vogue enlisted Annie Leibovitz for an 18th-century-themed editorial starring Kirsten Dunst as the Dauphine. Photographed nowhere else but Versailles, Dunst is resplendent in designer interpretations of rococo fashions, descending the stairs of a gilded carriage and poised amongst members of her court all similarly done up in the confectious, pastel colors typical of 18th-century dress. Having built a reputation for reappropriating just about anything into their runway concoctions, the 2012 Victoria’s Secret fashion show presented a dress which resembled a McQueen gown worn by Dunst in the 2006 Vogue editorial.

 

 

Kirsten Dunst in Alexander McQueen for Vogue September 2006 by Annie Leibovitz

Kirsten Dunst in Alexander McQueen for Vogue September 2006 by Annie Leibovitz

 

Magdalena Frackowiak in the 2012 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show

Magdalena Frackowiak in the 2012 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show

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Hats Off

Richard Avedon and Giampaolo SguraThe same year the model would sign an unheard of six-figure annual contract with Revlon, Lauren Hutton was photographed by Richard Avedon for the July 1973 issue of Vogue. Posing for the 1973 cover story “The American Woman Today Part 1,” Lauren Hutton would serve as both the all-American beauty ideal of the period along with the era’s most highly compensated model, setting a standard for many to follow. On the cover of Vogue Spain June 2013, model Anja Rubik is styled a crisp white blouse and army green bucket hat, much like Hutton 40 years earlier. However, an obvious distinction between the two: Hutton’s southern roots and Anja Rubik’s Polish nationality.

Comparison Courtesy of: Juan Andrés Puertas 

Lauren Hutton for <i>Vogue</i> by Richard Avedon, July 1973

Lauren Hutton for Vogue by Richard Avedon, July 1973

 

 

Anja Rubik by Giampaolo Sgura for <ii>Vogue Spain</i>, June 2013

Anja Rubik by Giampaolo Sgura for Vogue Spain, June 2013

 

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Punked Out

Craig McDean and Terry RichardsonCelebrating the launch of Daft Punk’s fourth studio album, Craig McDean photographed the incognito duo alongside Karlie Kloss who sported a sort of helmet herself which took form as a thick straw-like bobbed wig. Published in Vogue’s July 2013 issue, the editorial featured the group walking about midtown Manhattan, seemingly unrecognizable to passersby save for their famous headpieces. For WSJ Magazine’s November 2013 issue, Terry Richardson would also cast the pair for the magazine’s cover who sporting their signature metallic helmets while posed with Gisele Bündchen.

 

 

Karlie Kloss and Daft Punk by Craig McDean, Vogue July, 2013

Karlie Kloss and Daft Punk by Craig McDean, Vogue July, 2013

 

Gisele and Daft Punk by Terry Richardson, WSJ Magazine, November 2013

Gisele and Daft Punk by Terry Richardson, WSJ Magazine, November 2013

 

 

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Fan Out

Alfred Eisenstaedt and Mark ShawPhotographer and photojournalist Alfred Eisenstaedt would photograph celebrities and politicians alike, capturing moments that showcased and helped to create the popular culture of his era. Among Marilyn Monroe and Sophia Loren, Katharine Hepburn would sit for Eisenstaedt; a photograph from Life Magazine in 1938 showcases the actress displaying the expanse of her pleated skirt, reclined on the floor whilst smoking a cigarette. A 1953 classically-themed editorial by Mark Shaw for Vanity Fair would feature a similar composition, with a reclined model whose diaphanous white skirt is splayed out beneath her.

Katharine Hepburn by Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1938

Katharine Hepburn by Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1938

 

Mark Shaw for Vanity Fair, 1953

Mark Shaw for Vanity Fair, 1953

 

 

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